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Commander's Corner Archive

  • Commander's Corner: Chief Master Sgt. Brian Lewis

    Have you ever asked yourself the most common question a person receives: why do you do what you do? I have asked this question many times before, and the standard cliché answers are often given: “because I signed up,” or “because it is the right thing to do.” Are these answers good enough? In my opinion, no!
  • Connectedness: Key to organizational success

    Connection is a basic human need that serves as a foundation for organizational success. This concept allows members to foster trust and security, which are essential for personal buy-in to the organization. In our recent resiliency tactical pause, some raised concerns over their inability to connect with students. This sentiment was echoed by a group of instructor pilots, who also sited connection as a major obstacle. This directly impacts our vision to sustaining the most professional pilot training organization to which we aspire. Whether in a classroom or work center, connection is the catalyst to success.
  • What drives you?

    I have lost count of the number of times I have been asked the question “what drives you to succeed?” When I was young, it was the need to be the best, the need to be no. 1, the need to be praised by friends and family.
  • The Art of the Debrief

    The U.S. Air Force is the premier combat air force in the world and the true source of our success lies in our desire to be the best at what we do. Debriefing is the key aspect to that success.
  • Command philosophy: professionalism, mission, balance

    Professionalism, Mission, and Balance are key components of my command philosophy. These are components that I feel are crucial for mission success, the health of the force, longevity, personal satisfaction, and personal drive.
  • Relationships matter

    One of Col Gentile’s 2019 focus areas for our wing is strengthening relationships. He has asked each member of Team XL to bolster relationships with our families, friends, and the Airman around us to include our subordinates, our peers, and our bosses. Upon hearing this focus area, I was reminded of an enduring lesson in leadership and life: relationships matter. Relationships matter because they form the foundation of success. This is especially true here at Laughlin. Building combat-ready pilots is a team sport that requires the contribution of many. No one accomplishes our mission alone. Instead, strong relationships enable mission success.
  • Leadership: how hard can it be?

    Charles Webb III, 47th Maintenance Directorate director, asks if leaders born or if they are taught, and he believes there are expert opinions supporting both ideas. He says just because one’s mom or dad made it to the rank of general doesn’t mean they’ve got the natural leadership ability to make a good general, but he points out the Air Force feels strongly that leaders can be created.
  • Putting our problems in perspective: visual reminders

    If you’ve ever visited my office, you’ll notice that I have a framed photograph hanging rather prominently on my back wall. The picture is of an Air Force Honor Guard member, diligently standing guard over two flag-draped caskets in the back of a C-17. This picture serves as a reminder of one of the most important jobs I have ever held in the Air Force.
  • Search for Initiative and Ownership

    When Gen. David Goldfein became Chief of Staff of the Air Force in mid-2016, he called squadrons the “beating heart” of the service and promised his first year as chief would focus on revitalizing the squadron, as the core-fighting unit of the Air Force. Now, with this new focus, it’s critical for one to dig deeper to discover the root of this shift in mindset— generating initiative and ownership.
  • Commander's corner: eating frogs for a living

    When I think about leadership and what attributes make a good leader, there is a laundry list I come up with; however, mental toughness is what stands out. There may be many factors on how one achieves or cultivates mental toughness, but at its core, achieving this skill starts with making a deliberate concerted choice each and every day to eat the proverbial frog.
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