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RAWS fights wars with radio waves

Staff Sgt. Jeremy Dauzat, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems supervisor checks voltage levels with RAWS Airmen at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 21, 2019, to ensure the transmitter is giving the right output so the pilots and controllers can radio one another. The radios in the ground air transmit receive site were recently replaced with newer ones which are simpler to maintain, cost fewer man-hours, and uses less space. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems Airmen discuss the tuning of radios at the Ground Air Transmit Receive site at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, on Aug. 21, 2019. One of the most common actions at the GATR site is tuning the frequencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

Senior Airman Triston Sparks, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems technician, measures the output of a card in decibels which controls how loud the audio is for air traffic controllers. This is how the RAWS team adjusts the volume at which pilots and air traffic controllers communicate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

Shane Blevins, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems technician, looks at a demarcation panel in the radar approach control facility at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas. “I like figuring out problems and installing new equipment,” Blevins. “One thing most people aren’t aware of is we have upgraded the instrument landing system from copper to fiber optics which provides more reliable and accurate information.” (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems Airmen at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, frequently use tools such as these to work on the Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System at the radar approach control center for tuning radios. “I knew what a screw driver and a pair of pliers were before the Air Force, but this job definitely gave me a whole new set of skills,” said Senior Airman Logan Sando, 47th OSS RAWS technician. “It’s nice to have this knowledge instead of tools seeming like foreign objects.” (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

Senior Airman Triston Sparks and Shane Blevins, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems technicians, walk to the radar approach control facility to repair reported outages at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, on Aug. 22, 2019. Working nearly around-the-clock, RAWS Airmen must take advantage of the non-flying hours early in the morning to inspect and fix radio and airfield equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

Senior Airman Mark Young, and Senior Airman Matthew Watson, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems technicians, step out of a remote supervisory unite at the Laughlin Airfield at Spofford, Texas on Aug. 21, 2019. The radio systems in the runway supervisory unit make it possible for the instructor pilots to talk to the student pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

Senior Airman Mark Young, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems technician inspects the Ground Radio Transceiver and describes the different parts of the machine at the Laughlin Airfield at Spofford, Texas, on Aug. 21, 2019. The GRT is inspected annually as a preventative measures inspection to test all the components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)

LAUGHLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Staff Sgt. Jeremy Dauzat, 47th Operations Support Squadron Radar Airfield Weather Systems supervisor checks voltage levels with RAWS Airmen at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 21, 2019, to ensure the transmitter is giving the right output so the pilots and controllers can radio one another. The radios in the ground air transmit receive site were recently replaced with newer ones which are simpler to maintain, cost fewer man-hours, and uses less space. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anne McCready)